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Why Use a Professional Snake Removalist?

Without question, snakes are a useful and vital part of our ecosystem. That does not alter the fact that there are some very venomous snakes in Australia. If you accidentally stumble across one, it can be a major safety issue for you and for anyone else that is around if approached. As our great nation becomes more populated, more people are finding snakes in their homes or places of work. Snakes and other reptiles and animals are being pushed into foreign areas as their own habitat gets reduced.

If you come across a snake in a place where it probably should not be, then our recommendation is always to treat it as dangerous. Contact a professional snake removalist rather than trying to remove and relocate a snake yourself. The chances of getting bitten if you upset or scare the snake are quite high.

A snake removalist has specialised training and equipment that allows them to move the snake with as minimal harm or distress done to it as possible. A professional will ensure the safety of everyone around too. Do you know that it is illegal to kill snakes? If you attack a snake, not only are you committing an illegal act to a protected species, but you also run the very real risk of getting hurt yourself. Bites from some snakes can be deadly. We suggest that it is better to hire a professional and get the job done safely and quickly.

Are there really Venomous Snakes in Brisbane?

Australia is acknowledged as home to a number of the world’s most deadly snakes. There is no surprise then that there are a few venomous snakes that can be found in Queensland and yes, Brisbane. Snakes have markings and characteristics that help us to differentiate them. However accurately distinguishing between and identifying can be a bit challenging, at times. We would always suggest that it is better to leave a professional snake removalist or handler to get up close rather than you doing it!

In and around Brisbane there are a number of highly venomous snakes commonly found. These include:

  • Eastern Brown.
  • Red-Bellied Black Snake
  • Eastern Small-Eyed Snake

And to a lesser degree

  • Death Adder,
  • Rough-Scaled Snake
  • Stephens Banded Snake

The Eastern Brown Snake is one that has comfortably made its way and adapted into the suburbs. It is worth noting that this snake is one of the most venomous not only in Australia but the world and is responsible for most fatal bites in Australia. You will find it in various shades of brown, from tan to almost black. When it feels threatened, the Eastern Brown Snake will rear up and make it’s signature ‘S’ shape making it appear aggressive. This is a warning not to get any closer. Even with this spectacular display, if left alone and you back away slowly it will soon prefer to escape than to chase down a giant which doesn’t make any logical survival sense.

Rough-Scaled Snakes and Stephens Banded Snakes are more commonly found near water at altitude. Though not as venomous as the Eastern Brown, they are an underestimated force to be reckoned with and can still punch way above their size with a fatal bite.

Death Adders are rarely seen due to their impeccable camouflage and stillness. An ambush predator, they position themselves under leaf litter exposing only their head and tiny tail which looks and moves remarkably like a worm and used as a lure to entice small vertebrates. Once close enough they strike at lightning speed and hang on pumping venom into the prey. Fair to note that the Common Death Adder holds the world’s record as the fastest striker but a very sluggish mover.

Red-Bellied Black Snakes and Eastern Small-Eyed Snakes tend to favour areas near water and looks exactly as the name suggests that it would. These snakes look very similar to each other and are also quite venomous. They are not as deadly as the Eastern Brown and are generally a shy snake but still an extremely dangerous snake to approach. We believe that it is really important that if you come across any snake you should leave it alone. Especially these highly deadly snakes. They can easily get into places that are not where they should be and can be difficult to identify for anyone who does not know what they are doing. Don’t risk it…contact a professional snake removalist. Do not approach them, you can endanger yourself and anyone else who is around at the time as well as putting undue stress and harm to the snake making it even more dangerous.

The Importance of Snakes to our Ecosystem

Just in case you are not aware of this…Snakes are a protected species. They play a vital role in the Australian eco-system. That means that when you call a professional snake removalist, they will specifically come to move a snake to a more appropriate place. A word of warning. You should never try to attack or kill a snake. Not only is it illegal, but there is also a real danger that you will get hurt. Don’t forget that this is their home and has been for a lot longer than it has been ours. As we develop more housing and industrial estates and encroach more into their habitats, they get dispersed. Their homes get disturbed due to land clearing for agriculture and increased housing. The snakes may become disrupted and find themselves in places that can be dangerous for both themselves and for us.

Their role in the ecosystem is as a mid-level predator. That means that their existence is important to ensure that the ecosystem remains balanced. With imbalance comes the threat that prey animals overpopulate and that is a story that does not end well. We can live safely with snakes. We just need to exercise common sense when we find ourselves around them. Do not try to approach, attack, or kill a snake if you come across one, even in circumstances where you feel threatened. Back away and make sure you are safe. Once you are you should call for a snake removalist. Let them come and do what they do best!

More often than not, if left alone they will move on by themselves and you’ll probably never see them again.

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