snake removal from a car

Why Use A Professional Snake Removalist?

Even though they are a necessary part of our ecosystem, there are some very venomous snakes in Australia so if you accidentally stumble across one, it can be a major safety issue for all of those around. As the weather changes and Australia becomes more populated, more people are finding snakes in their homes or places of work; if you do come across a snake in a place where they probably should not be, then it is a smart idea to contact a professional snake removalist. It is not advised to try and remove the snake yourself because the chance of getting bitten if you upset or scare the snake is quite high. A snake removalist has specialised training and equipment that allows them to relocate the snake with as minimal harm done to the snake while also keeping the removalist and those around them safe as well. Most people do not know as well that it is illegal to kill snakes so if you attack a snake, not only are you committing an illegal act to a protected species, you also run the risk of getting hurt yourself. Bites from certain snakes can be deadly hence it is wise to just place the job of removing and re-homing the snake in the hands of a professional.

Highly Venomous Snakes in Queensland

The deadly snakes of Australia are quite documented to the world so there is no surprise that there are a few venomous snakes that call Queensland home. While snakes do have certain markings and characteristics that differentiate them, accurately distinguishing between and identifying snakes can be a tough job; it is better to leave a professional snake removalist or handler to get up close rather than yourself. Around Brisbane alone there are quite a few venomous snakes like the Coastal Taipan, Tiger Snake, Death Adder, Rough-Scaled Snake and the Eastern Brown Snake. The Eastern Brown Snake is the only one that sometimes makes its way into the suburbs but this snake is one of the deadliest in Australia. Coming in various shades of brown, from tan to almost black, the Eastern Brown Snake will rear up and make an ‘S’ shape if it is feeling threatened. Rough-Scaled Snakes are more commonly found near water, and while not as venomous as some of the other snakes, it still can be potentially dangerous. The Coastal Taipan is lighter, more pale brown on its top and paler on the sides, with it’s snout and jaw coming in a pale-yellow colour. This snake is highly venomous and should not be approached. Preferring habitats near water, the Red-Bellied Black Snake looks exactly as the name suggest and is quite venomous too. Not as deadly as the Eastern Brown or Coastal Taipan, it is still a very dangerous snake to approach so it is incredibly important that if you come across any snake, but especially these highly deadly snakes where they should not be then it is best to contact a professional snake removalist. Do not approach them as you may endanger yourself or somebody around you.

The Importance of Snakes; No Kill, Relocate Strategy

Snakes are a protected species and are important to overall Australian eco-system therefore when you contact a snake removalist, they specifically come to relocate a snake. You should never try to attack or kill a snake because not only is it illegal and you may get hurt, this is their home as much as ours and they belong on the land. As we are encroaching more onto their land, with their homes being disrupted due to land clearing for agriculture and increased housing, they may become disrupted and find themselves in places that can be dangerous for the public. Their role in the ecosystem is a mid-level predator thus their existence is important so the ecosystem remains balanced and prey animals do not overpopulate. We can live safely with snakes if we just exercise common sense around them. Do not try to approach, attack or kill a snake if you come across one, even if you feel threatened. Just back off and call for a snake removalist; it is a safer and better solution for all.

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